« Back to home

How IAP Desktop protects TCP tunnels

Posted on

In the last post, we looked at the risks of using local port forwarding and how it’s difficult to protect TCP tunnels in a multi-user environment. In this post, we take a look at how IAP Desktop protects its tunnels. Read more »

Hijacking other user’s TCP tunnels

Posted on

If you are a frequent SSH user, then you’ll be familiar with local port forwarding. Creating tunnels by using local port forwarding is useful, easy, but also not without risks. Read more »

Onboarding workforce identities to Google Cloud

Posted on

In a company’s journey to the cloud, one of the topics that is important to sort out early is identity management. To do anything meaningful with Google Cloud, employees need to be able to sign in to the Cloud Console – but manually creating user accounts for each employee is rarely a good idea. Read more »

Relaunching the blog

Posted on

A bit over 12 years ago I started this blog to write about Windows development. Back then, I spent the majority of both my free time and time at work developing Win32 and COM-based software and I was just starting to tip my toes into Kernel-mode development.

One year later, in 2008, I begun working on my master’s thesis on function boundary tracing in the Windows kernel, which led to posts about runtime code modification on IA-32, Hotpatching, Detours, NTrace, and other fun stuff.

Things got quiet after 2010 when I changed careers and begun working as a consultant. My focus shifted from Windows development to architecting scalable systems and later led me to entirely different topics such as leading development teams and optimizing the software development lifecycle.

Although I never stopped doing Windows development, it got less over time – and I had less to write about on this blog.

Now it is about time to get more active again on this blog. And as a first step, I moved this blog to a new home.

Read more »